COP25 President meets with indigenous representatives to consolidate their contribution to global climate action

Minister of the Environment and COP25 President, Carolina Schmidt, together with the United Kingdom’s Regional Ambassador for Latin America of COP26, Fiona Clouder, met virtually with indigenous representatives from Latin America and the Caribbean to learn about their experiences in dealing with climate change.

COP25 Presidency, within the framework of the commemoration of the International Day of Indigenous Peoples, invited indigenous organizations on climate change to a space for analysis and presentation of their visions regarding Climate Change and Nature-based Solutions, with the purpose of strengthening the linkage of the world’s indigenous communities with the States in the challenges that have been established in the area of climate change since the Paris Agreement and in the Platform of Local Communities and Indigenous Peoples (LCIPP, for its acronym in English) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

The webinar on Indigenous Peoples and climate change, referred to “The contribution and link between Indigenous Cosmovision and NBS” was an instance to also analyze the current situation of indigenous communities and climate change, within the framework of the new context of Covid-19.

“COP25 Presidency, with the strong conviction to enhance the contribution of indigenous peoples in climate action, has supported global indigenous participation, and especially Latin American participation in international instances, opening spaces for dialogue and the promotion of their knowledge ancestral. In this context, this webinar presented the main recommendations that indigenous brothers and sisters have for the process of building climate change policies in each country and we learned about the visions on climate change and solutions based on nature from the perspective of the indigenous worldview,” said the Minister of the Environment and COP25 President, Carolina Schmidt.

“Now more than ever is the time to work together – exchanging ideas and best practices, building international understanding and joint approaches – to confront both the pandemic and the other crisis that threatens us as humanity: climate change,” said Fiona Clouder, diplomat and COP26 UK regional ambassador for Latin America.

“We need to get up, clean our waters, take care of our climate. For us the Earth is sick and we need to recover it,” was the call of Kiriath Campillay of the Diaguita people (Chile), spiritual guide of his people and representative of the Indigenous Caucus of Chile on Climate Change.

For his part, Estebancio Castro from the Kuna People (Panama), consultant on the rights of indigenous people and Climate Change, and member of the facilitative working group of the Platform of Local Communities and Indigenous Peoples (LCIPP) of the UNFCCC, explained that “for many, when we talk about the Worldview, we talk about our spirituality and our resources. The importance of indigenous peoples with that unique relationship they have with their territory, their lands and their resources cannot be separated to develop or contribute to the climate crisis. It is necessary to see how we support with mitigation”.

For Johnson Cerda of the Kichwa People of Limoncocha (Ecuador), Director DGM / GEA, Conservation International / International Forum of Indigenous Peoples on Climate Change (IIPFCC), it is important to ensure land titling, full and effective participation, and their participation in climate change negotiations. “The experiences that indigenous peoples have are key to the effort that we all want to make to face climate change,” he said.

Hortencia Hidalgo, from the Aymara people (Chile), Network of Indigenous Women on Biodiversity of Latin America and the Caribbean (RMIB-LAC)/International Forum of Indigenous Peoples on Climate Change (IIPFCC), reinforced that “indigenous peoples have fundamental knowledge for any activity to face the effects of climate change. We can be a contribution to society”.

The representative of the Mapuche Williche people (Chile), Juan Arriagada, and spokesperson for the Chilean Indigenous Caucus on Climate Change assured that “indigenous peoples continue to believe in a genuine dialogue where our rights, territory and spirituality are respected.”

The objective of this webinar is that the opinions and experiences shared serve to reveal the learning and wisdom of indigenous peoples in the design of the policies of the States Parties to the UNFCCC as well as to strengthen the relationship between the different actors in the process of the UNFCCC and indigenous communities.

Members of the Chilean Indigenous Caucus explored the different challenges and visions to address Climate Change integrating their Cosmovision and knowledge

Minister for Environment and COP25 President, Carolina Schmidt, alongside the Resident Coordinator of the United Nations in Chile, Silvia Rucks, and the Undersecretary of the Ministry of Social Development, Sebastián Villarreal, met virtually with members of Chile’s Indigenous Peoples Caucus on Climate Change.
During the event, the authorities pledged their support in formalizing the Indigenous Caucus of Chile on Climate Change, and reinforcing work between their people, the Government and the United Nations to advance and achieve concrete measures that incorporate the worldview in climate change policies.

In commemoration of the “International Indigenous Peoples Day”, on Sunday 9th August Minister for Environment and COP25 President, Carolina Schmidt, along with the Resident Coordinator of the United Nations System in Chile, Silvia Rucks, and Sebastián Villarreal, of the Ministry of Social Development and Family, met virtually with members of Chile’s Indigenous Peoples Caucus on Climate Change in order to exchange insights and challenges on addressing Climate Change from the perspective of Indigenous Peoples, based on experiences of participation in COP25.

In the context of its Presidency of COP25, since 2019 Chile’s Ministry for Environment – with its strong commitment to enhancing the contribution of indigenous peoples to climate action – has supported global indigenous participation, particularly from Latin America, in international initiatives, establishing spaces for dialogue and promoting the unique knowledge of these groups.

“Due to their close relationship with the environment, indigenous peoples are in a unique position to address, through their ancestral knowledge, the challenges of climate change. As the Presidency of COP25, we seek to strengthen the knowledge, technologies, practices and efforts of local communities and indigenous peoples related to the response to climate change”, says Minister Carolina Schmidt.

It is in this context that, in conjunction with the Ministry of Social Development and Family, and with the support and accompaniment of the United Nations System in Chile, the decision was taken to establish a ‘Chilean Indigenous Caucus for COP25’ as part of preparation for last year’s summit, convening a range of indigenous leaders and experts from the country.

The creation of this space for dialogue has been critical, offering a first step to incorporating the indigenous worldview on climate change: the knowledge and wisdom of Indigenous Peoples about nature is an invaluable contribution to climate action in Chile and globally.

“We thank the members of the Chilean Indigenous Caucus for their commitment to creating global strategies for mitigation and adaptation in the area of climate change. Their willingness to give continuity to this dialogue, by sharing the wisdom, ancestral practices and worldview of indigenous peoples is a tremendous contribution to understanding an issue that concerns and affects all of humanity”, says the Undersecretary for Social Development of the Ministry for Social Development and Family, Sebastián Villarreal.

For her part, the Coordinator of the United Nations in Chile, Silvia Rucks, expressed her strong appreciation to members of the Chilean Indigenous for their interest in continuing to work at nationally and internationally on responding to climate change. She stressed that “we have a lot to learn from indigenous peoples, who are the ones who have been at the forefront of the demand for environmental and climate measures throughout the planet.”

The representative of UN Chile, also greeted the Indigenous Peoples represented at the meeting, on the occasion of the International Day of Indigenous Peoples commemorated every August 9, reiterating “the decision of the United Nations to make the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and to shore up the resilience of these peoples ”.

Following the launch of the call for applications to join the Chilean Indigenous Caucus, 69 applications we received, of which 25 successful candidates were selected in accordance with criteria that sought to prioritize the following attributes:

  1. a) Individuals belonging to the Indigenous Peoples of Chile, with academic training and/or verifiable knowledge on environmental issues;
  2. b) Individuals belonging to the Indigenous Peoples of Chile who, individually or as part of a community, association or organization, undertake specific initiatives focused on environmental issues, especially related to climate change; and
  3. c) Indigenous leaders and/or representatives who have held a leadership role in processes or initiatives focused on environmental issues and especially climate change.

A central objective in the formation of the Caucus was to strengthen the participation of Chile’s Indigenous People in discussion of global strategies to address climate change. In addition, the Caucus seeks to promote the exchange of experiences by members and facilitate participation in national and international climate change initiatives; to promote the development of public policy in a way that respects and promotes Indigenous People’s interests; and to facilitate the implementation of ambitious climate action that contribute to a global efforts to tackle climate change.

Following seven working sessions held from 18th-21st November 2019 and the suspension of preparatory activities as a result of COP25 not being held in Santiago, the organizing team arranged for the participation of the Caucus in COP25 sessions held in Madrid, Spain, last December.

“Participating in COP25 in Madrid, Spain, allowed me to have a broader view by learning from the experience of my other brothers from indigenous peoples around the world on adaptation, mitigation, sustainable development and successful practices. We listen to the story of other brothers and sisters who have the same problems and feel the same urgency as us,” says Rayén Cariman, a Mapuche Woman from Lof Karumanke. “It is possible that together we can contribute to mitigate and help heal our Ñuke Mapu (Mother Earth). For us Mapuches, in our worldview, what hurts us the most is that our Mother is ill. She is not a stranger, Mother Earth, she is our mother, and we are going to do whatever is necessary for her to heal”, she adds.

Freddy Sebastián Medina, Member of the Indigenous Caucus of Chile on Climate Change, comments: “The creation of the Indigenous Caucus of Chile is a first step to establishing a permanent dialogue between indigenous communities and the public administration on the climate and environmental emergency that we are suffering in Chile. Based on my experience at COP25, I believe that it is increasingly urgent that indigenous peoples co-lead climate action – not only within their communities – but also in the Regional Committees on Climate Change (CORECC), especially now that Chile will hold the COP25 Presidency for two years, something which is unprecedented in the history of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). I also believe that it is an opportunity to drive progress in mitigating measures and to recover water resources, especially in indigenous territories”.

Video

Embracing a sustainable recovery in the Chilean context of Covid-19

This morning the webinar “Embracing a sustainable recovery in the Chilean context of Covid-19” was held with presentations by the Dean of the Faculty of Economics and Business of the University of Chile, José de Gregorio, and the Minister of the Environment of Chile and COP25 President, Carolina Schmidt.

The meeting was attended by the University College London professor Mariana Mazzucato, the British economist Lord Nicholas Stern and his colleague Amar Bhattacharya.

The virtual event was closed by the Minister of Energy of Chile, Juan Carlos Jobet.

In her speech, Minister Schmidt referred to the “big challenge in front of us. But, at the same time, we have a unique opportunity to use this crisis to accelerate our transformation to a more inclusive, cleaner, healthier, low carbon and resilient economy for the world´s future.”

“A real sustainable recovery must focus on people needs and foster economic growth with the environment. Boost, as a top priority, investments that can generate in a fast way: large numbers of jobs while, at the same time, accelerate the de-carbonization of our energy matrix, reduce pollution, build clean transport systems, sustainable cities and green infrastructure for the growth of our economies”, he said.

In this link you can see the complete webinar.

Presidency of COP25 conducts dialogue with UNFCCC observers on ambition in the NDCs

The COP25 Presidency met virtually this morning with the 9 UNFCCC Constituencies and NGOs to hear their views on how civil society can contribute to improving ambition in the NDCs of Parties.

To date, 11 countries have submitted their updated or improved NDCs, and an additional 150 nations are expected to join.

On the occasion, The UNFCCC Executive Secretary, Patricia Espinosa, started this meeting and made a strong call for participation.

“Now, more than ever, we need to ensure that we address the most pressing challenge for us and future generations: climate change. The urgency of recovering from the current pandemic cannot be an excuse to adopt policies that would lock societies in a high emissions trajectory. In this regard, the work of civil society is key: from providing technical solutions to advocating for the right policies and voices of the vulnerable, and for that, spaces need to be created for them to contribute all their expertise”.

COP25 President and Minister of the Environment of Chile, Carolina Schmidt, chaired this meeting, making a strong call to make the relationship between the Parties and civil society more fluid, both in demanding urgent action and ambition by governments and also in offering solutions.

“The Chilean Presidency has strongly favoured the interaction with Non State Actors, and will continue to do so, by highlighting the importance of their contribution in the debates; the expert view of many in technical issues, the relevance of traditional and indigenous knowledge in climate solutions, and the centrality of science and the inputs from the science community to monitor and understand climate processes and projections”, said Schmidt.

Representatives of Business and industry non-governmental organizations (BINGO), Environmental non-governmental organizations (ENGO), Farmers, Indigenous peoples organizations (IPO), Local government and municipal authorities (LGMA), Research and independent non-governmental organizations (RINGO), Trade Unions non-governmental organizations (TUNGO), Women and Gender, Youth non-governmental organizations (YOUNGO).

Chile participates in the 4th Ministerial on Climate Action (MoCA)

At the 4th Ministerial on Climate Action (MoCA) co-hosted by Frans Timmermans, Executive Vice-President for the European Green Deal European Commission, the Minister for Environment and Climate Change of Canada Jonathan Wilkinson and the Minister for Ecology and Environment of China Huang Runqiu, about 30 ministers gathered to discuss a green and sustainable recovery, post Covid-19, aligned to the Paris Agreement.

In her speech, the President of COP25 and Minister of Environment, Carolina Schmidt, called on countries to “develop and implement plans to recover our economies and jobs” that have not only been affected by the Pandemic, but also by climate change that has not been in quarantine.

Complete speech of the Minister of Environment of Chile, Carolina Schmidt:

Distinguished ministers and delegates, my warm greetings, and a special thanks to Canada, China and the European Union for convening this meeting.

The first half of 2020 has unfolded in a very challenging and unexpected manner. The Covid-19 pandemic represents one the biggest health crisis in the history of humanity, impacting people’s lives in manifold and serious ways.

In the short term the first priority for governments has been to look after the health of our citizens. But we should be working hard as well to develop and implement plans to recover our economies and jobs facing the other global crisis we are living and that has Not Been in quarantine: Climate Change.

What our citizen expect of Leaders in time of crisis is certainty. To provide this certainty leaders has to show clear goals and a long term vision for our recovery plans.

3 concrete actions are decisive to show this leadership, align our economic recovery plans to the Paris Agreement and use this crisis to accelerate the transformation to the New economy RECOVERING BETTER:

1- Presenting updated NDCs with ambitious commitments for 2030, and Long Term Climate Strategies aimed at carbon neutrality by 2050

While Covid-19 may have postponed COP26, it has not postponed the need for Parties to deliver the commitments they have made under the Paris Agreement – most notably, the submission of more ambitious NDCs this year in 2020.

In this spirit, in the month of April, Chile presented a significantly enhanced NDC that, in line with the Paris Agreement, targets a long-term vision of carbon neutrality by 2050.

Our NDC represents a critical milestone on this path, committing to an absolute carbon budget for the period 2020- 2030 and a series of other measures, spanning adaptation and integrative actions on oceans, forests, circular economy, finance and nature-based solutions.

Updating our NDC commitments should not be seen as an unnecessary distraction from the health crisis. On the contrary, presenting enhanced NDCs this year is more important than ever because NDCs commitments actually act as a beacon to guide the social and economic recovery after the Covid-19 crisis.

Globally First NDCs were presented five years ago. Today there is a clear opportunity to increase our collective ambition, through updating with ambition our contributions showing leadership and setting the goals for a Green Recovery. We then look forward to the UNFCCC’s NDC Synthesis Report showing the joint effect of parties’ commitments and how much work remains to deliver the Paris goals.

2- International financing for green recovery

The international resources that support global reactivation must contain decarbonisation requirements. This will help the developing countries to accelerate the decarbonisation of our economies and mobilize private sector.

A clear example of this is the Norwegian Sovereign Wealth Fund that owns 1.5% of the global stock markets, that recently announced will invest only in sustainable, low carbon companies and projects.

The decision made by this important international fund has had already important impacts in many multinational companies present in developing countries. In the case of Chile this decision has accelerated the closure of some coal power plants in almost 10 years from originally planned.

Examples like this show us that low carbon requirements for international funds can be an opportunity to mobilize the private sector accelerating the decarbonisation processes in our countries.

We call developed countries to mobilize resources that enable private and public sectors to decouple economic growth from fossil energy consumption, while promoting sustainable investments and green jobs.

In our country we have successfully used Green Sovereign Bonds. They play an important role by contributing to achieving the climate goals while also promoting an economic and socio- environmental revival agenda to face the crisis due to Covid-19 , with sustainability criteria, marking a path towards a low carbon and climate resilient economy.

3- use the Covid-19 green recovery as an Opportunity to accelerate decarbonisation with a SOCIAL emphasis, improving the quality of life of people in their territories

Green recovery efforts provide a huge opportunity to accelerate our transformation to a low carbon and resilient economy with a social focus, generating New jobs and creating opportunities for the communities in their territories, reducing local pollution, and giving access to cleaner and cheaper energy to families and water security.

For Chile is critical that we focus our investments in the following areas that has a greater social and environmental impact for our communities:

• Renewable energies
• Energy and watter efficiency
• Sustainable building and industry
• Electromobility
• Nature-based solutions

In line with this approach, our new NDC included a novel social pillar, which addresses all of our commitments in line with the Sustainable Development Goals and also considers the development of a just transition strategy that will support our decarbonisation process.

Dear ministers and colleagues,

The strategies with develop to recover to Covid-19 will be will be decisive in our ability to address climate change. How we respond to this economic crisis, must be a top priority for the international community.

I call upon you to exercise decisive leadership in the 3 main areas that I have mentioned so we can make sure that our efforts allow us to build back better for the benefits of our people and their territories.

Thank you.

Network and Website to Address Loss and Damage Launched

The Santiago Network website on addressing loss and damage resulting from climate change impacts was launched on June 8th. The Network will catalyze and channel reliable technical assistance to support efforts to address loss and damage by connecting organizations and experts active in providing such assistance.

The loss and damage mechanism was established at COP19 in Warsaw in 2013 to address loss and damage associated with impacts of climate change, including extreme events and slow onset events in developing countries that are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change.

“Many developing countries are facing difficult times due to climate change, with vulnerable communities particularly affected as events such as drought, typhoons and other climate-induced disasters continue across different parts of the world,” said H.E. Carolina Schmidt, Chile’s Minster of Environment and President of COP 25.

The launch of the Santiago Network comes at the time when nations are planning for recovery efforts from COVID-19. Addressing impacts of loss and damage resulting from climate change and other goals under the Paris Agreement, if pursued simultaneously, can help build a more sustainable, resilient world over the long term. To do this, vulnerable developing countries require increased technical assistance that can be accessed rapidly, fits the needs on the ground and is mobilized at a scale that integrates with recovery efforts.

How will the Santiago Network catalyze technical assistance?

Mandated at COP25, the Santiago Network will catalyze access to, and organize the availability of technical assistance by creating synergies and partnerships among governments, UN agencies, multilateral agencies and NGOs, by aligning support needs of countries.

Catalyzing technical assistance though the Santiago Network could take the form of:

  • Developing technical approaches to avert, minimize and address loss and damage
  • Enabling quick access to planning tools and solutions, including engaging in direct conversations with technical and investment experts
  • Organizing exchange of knowledge, practices and approaches between organizations
  • Interacting with organizations and encouraging them to take advantage of the network in order to develop transformational programmes and large-scale regional initiatives projects
  • Facilitating new partnership arrangements through joint ventures, consortiums and technical corporation
  • Convening organizations, bodies, networks and experts to leverage additional resources, and where possible, reduce duplication of efforts.

How to use the website?

The website provides a platform for countries, organizations, networks and experts to interact on technical assistance needs and scope the nature work of required in vulnerable developing countries.

By mobilizing the Santiago Network, the website builds a foundation for countries and organizations to engage, identify and share ways in which organizations can mobilize technical assistance to generate regional, global and transboundary initiatives to avert, minimize and address loss and damage.

You can access the website here.

Outlook of the Santiago Network

H.E. Carolina Schmidt said: “The Network will catalyze and channel reliable technical assistance to support efforts and approaches to address loss and damage, contributing to the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda. More importantly, it is my personal hope that the Santiago Network will spark new partnerships, joint ventures, consortiums and technical corporations, and we have requested the secretariat to proceed along these principles.”

These are very early stages of establishing the Santiago Network.  Many of the functions of the Network and the website will be gradually developed over time to better align with the technical assistance needs of countries. The initial web-based platform provides a space to begin channeling reliable and effective assistance quickly into strategic and high-quality operations, medium- to long-term investments, humanitarian services and immediate technical needs.

Chile begins the participatory elaboration of it Long-Term Climate Strategy

With the aim of establishing actions to combat climate change as a state policy, the Ministry of the Environment kicked off a new stakeholder engagement process to develop the Long-Term Climate Strategy (LTCS) from Chile –  an instrument that will define, over a 30-year timeline, the way forward in the transition to emission neutral and climate resilient development by 2050, as the science demands.

In the online presentation given this morning, the Minister of the Environment, Carolina Schmidt, maintained that “without doubt, today we live in exceptional times, the Covid-19 pandemic is a reality and global concern. Its impact is added to the climate crisis that we face across the world, generating a ‘syndemic’, with economic, political, social and even effects on our ability to coexist.”

She added that “in the midst of the Covid pandemic, Chile updated its NDCs, that is, our medium-term goals to tackle climate change, as well as our commitment to carbon neutrality by 2050. But the goals are not enough, we must co-construct the pathway to ensure that we overcome this crisis with a green recovery, which is why today we start the process of engaging stakeholders on the Long-Term Climate Strategy.”

The Energy Minister, Juan Carlos Jobet, also participated, setting out further details on the country’s route to achieve carbon neutrality. In turn, the Minister of the Minister of Environment and Sustainable Development of Colombia, Ricardo Lozano, shared the strategy that his country is developing to combat climate change.

Strategy details

The LTCS is an instrument that defines the general long-term guidelines that the country will follow across the economy and in an integrated manner, over the next 30 years, , to face the challenges presented by climate change; transition towards a model of low-emission development, until achieving and maintaining emissions neutrality; reduce vulnerability and increase resilience to the adverse effects of climate change; and, to fulfill the international commitments made by the country.

Among its most relevant contents, the definition of a national greenhouse gas emissions budget for the year 2030 and 2050, the sectoral mitigation goals (emission budgets for each of the sectors), and the indicators and goals stand out. Additionally, it contains guidelines on adaptation to climate change, as well as risk assessment, considering the vulnerability of each specific sector.

The LTCS will be based around four pillars, which are Science, Cost-effectiveness, Integrative Measures; and socio-economic priorities. The process of preparing the LTCS considers more than 80 workshops and development sessions in which actors from the public, private, academic and civil society sectors will participate, ensuring that in all participatory instances, the representation of regional actors, youth and communities, in addition to meeting gender parity criteria.

For the process of preparing the LTCS we have received the valuable technical and financial support of various international organizations such as the World Bank, Inter-American Development Bank, ECLAC, Euroclima +, Global Environment Facility, GIZ, NDC Partnership, FAO, UN Environment, UNDP, among others.

After the launch, a discussion on “How to face the climate crisis on the way to 2050” took place. It was moderated by Christiana Figueres, former executive secretary of UN Environment, and featured the participation of Laurence Tubiana (European Climate Foundation), Marianne Fay (World Bank), Ennio Vivaldi (U. of Chile), Bernardo Larraín (Sofofa), Isabella participated. Villanueva (CEUS).

 

Chile calls on countries to present more ambitious NDCs and long-term climate strategies

For two days, the Petersberg Climate Dialogue was held virtually with Germany and the United Kingdom as hosts.

The meeting brought together more than 30 ministers who reflected on how the world can recover once the COVID-19 pandemic has been overcome in a climate-resilient way.

The 11th meeting was chaired by the German Minister for the Environment, Svenja Schulze, and by the designated COP26 President, Alok Sharma.

The first intervention was from the German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, who reinforced the importance of multilateralism at this time when the world is facing COVID-19: “The Coronavirus painfully shows us that international cooperation is crucial. (…) It is clear that the more we work together, the more we will avoid human suffering and economic distortions, or at least we will be able to contain them,” he said.

For his part, the Secretary General of the United Nations, António Guterres said: “They say it is darker just before dawn. These are dark days, but they are not days without hope. We have a short and rare opportunity to change our world for the better.”

The Minister of Environment of Chile and President of COP25, Carolina Schmidt, was the first Secretary of State to intervene.

“The calls from the international climate community have been clear in recent weeks: despite the health crisis, climate action must continue at all levels,” he said.

At the beginning of April, Chile presented the update of its NDC. In this regard, Schmidt called on countries to present more ambitious NDCs and long-term climate strategies this year 2020, under the Paris Agreement.

“These commitments should not be seen as an unnecessary distraction from the health crisis. In fact, they may be part of the solution: NDCs and long-term strategies may be the blueprint for designing recovery strategies that are aligned with high emission reductions,” she said.

Minister Carolina Schmidt explained that the NDC in Chile is committed “to an absolute carbon budget for the period 2020-2030 and a series of other measures, specially spanning adaptation and integration: covering commitments in oceans, forests, circular economy, and nature-based solutions. What I specially want to highlight is the inclusion of a social pillar for the first time in a NDC. This pillar serves as anchor for all our climate commitments, connecting them to the 2030 SDG – and committing the development of a “Just Transition Strategy” focusing in the protection of the most vulnerable people and their territories.

Our new enhanced NDC not only promotes a more ambitious climate action but also it fosters a socioeconomic and a more inclusive development. which is especially crucial as we recover from Covid-19 and its economic impacts.”

Before concluding the high-level session of the Petersberg Climate Dialogue, the designated president of COP26 assured that “the climate crisis has not taken time off and we still have time to define the future, although the window is closing. We need an ambitious roadmap for COP26,” and he recalled that the axes of his Presidency are transition to clean energy, clean transport, nature-based solutions, adaptation and resilience, and finance.

Chile calls on countries to present more ambitious NDCs and long-term climate strategies

For two days, the Petersberg Climate Dialogue was held virtually with Germany and the United Kingdom as hosts.

The meeting brought together more than 30 ministers who reflected on how the world can recover once the COVID-19 pandemic has been overcome in a climate-resilient way.

The 11th meeting was chaired by the German Minister for the Environment, Svenja Schulze, and by the designated COP26 President, Alok Sharma.

The first intervention was from the German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, who reinforced the importance of multilateralism at this time when the world is facing COVID-19: “The Coronavirus painfully shows us that international cooperation is crucial. (…) It is clear that the more we work together, the more we will avoid human suffering and economic distortions, or at least we will be able to contain them,” he said.

For his part, the Secretary General of the United Nations, António Guterres said: “They say it is darker just before dawn. These are dark days, but they are not days without hope. We have a short and rare opportunity to change our world for the better.”

The Minister of Environment of Chile and President of COP25, Carolina Schmidt, was the first Secretary of State to intervene.

“The calls from the international climate community have been clear in recent weeks: despite the health crisis, climate action must continue at all levels,” he said.

At the beginning of April, Chile presented the update of its NDC. In this regard, Schmidt called on countries to present more ambitious NDCs and long-term climate strategies this year 2020, under the Paris Agreement.

“These commitments should not be seen as an unnecessary distraction from the health crisis. In fact, they may be part of the solution: NDCs and long-term strategies may be the blueprint for designing recovery strategies that are aligned with high emission reductions,” she said.

Minister Carolina Schmidt explained that the NDC in Chile is committed “to an absolute carbon budget for the period 2020-2030 and a series of other measures, specially spanning adaptation and integration: covering commitments in oceans, forests, circular economy, and nature-based solutions. What I specially want to highlight is the inclusion of a social pillar for the first time in a NDC. This pillar serves as anchor for all our climate commitments, connecting them to the 2030 SDG – and committing the development of a “Just Transition Strategy” focusing in the protection of the most vulnerable people and their territories.

Our new enhanced NDC not only promotes a more ambitious climate action but also it fosters a socioeconomic and a more inclusive development. which is especially crucial as we recover from Covid-19 and its economic impacts.”

Before concluding the high-level session of the Petersberg Climate Dialogue, the designated president of COP26 assured that “the climate crisis has not taken time off and we still have time to define the future, although the window is closing. We need an ambitious roadmap for COP26,” and he recalled that the axes of his Presidency are transition to clean energy, clean transport, nature-based solutions, adaptation and resilience, and finance.

Chile launches the update of its emissions reduction commitment and measures to face climate change

  • The Environment Minister, Carolina Schmidt, asserted that the enhanced Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) lays the way for the country to advance at pace with the transition to a low-emission and climate-resilient economy, bringing significant social, environmental and economic benefits to improve standards of living.
  • The Minister for Energy, Juan Carlos Jobet, stressed that “achieving Carbon Neutrality by 2050 is more relevant today than ever and the NDC is an intermediate milestone to fulfill that commitment. Our country’s plan was prepared prioritizing the most cost-effective measures, as in this way we can support the wellbeing of Chileans and enhance our economic recovery.”
  • The Minister of Science, Andrés Couve, highlighted the role of Chile’s scientific community through the COP25 Scientific Committee which made important contributions to the development and improvement of the final NDC: “Today, the Chilean NDC has a scientific basis with a goal and a peak year of emissions that have been clearly established in accordance with the best evidence we have available.”

Via videoconference, the Chilean Government officially submitted its updated Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), becoming the first Latin American country and one of a small group of countries in the world to do so. This document is a requirement established by the Paris Agreement. It contains the country’s commitments to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2030 and address the impacts of climate change.

The document was presented by the Minister for the Environment and COP25 President, Carolina Schmidt; the Minister for Energy, Juan Carlos Jobet; and the Minister for Science, Andrés Couve. Connecting from Germany was the Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC, Patricia Espinosa, who warmly received the submission of Chile’s climate commitments.

Minister Schmidt maintained that “when we overcome the [health] crisis, we will enter a period of reactivation that must be sustainable, where recovery plans must consider the climate crisis and its social impacts on people and the planet as a fundamental element. This is a key moment, which is why we are presenting our new NDC with ambitious goals and commitments that allow us to focus our recovery plans on a clear objective: advancing at pace with the transformation towards a low-emission and climate-resilient economy, with significant social, environmental and economic benefits to improve people’s standard of living”.

The Secretary of State added that “for this reason, this new NDC establishes ambitious goals across four central pillars: mitigation, adaptation, integration measures and, for the first time, a social pillar that permeates the other three to direct our development towards one that is low in emissions and resilient to climate, while maintaining focus on the impacts for the lives of people in their local areas”.

Minister Jobet indicated that “the measures are prioritized according to their cost efficiency and grouped into six lines of action. These strands and their respective contribution to CN 2050 are: sustainable industry and mining (25%), hydrogen production and consumption (21)%, sustainable construction of homes and public-commercial buildings (17%), electromobility mainly of public systems (17%), removal of coal-fired power plants (13%) – which is one of the central enabling measures – and other energy efficiency measures (7%)”.

He added that “achieving the goal of Carbon Neutrality would mean investment opportunities of between US$ 27,300 and US$ 48,600 million by 2050.”

Minister Couve emphasized that “for the first time, the national scientific community actively participated to provide evidence for the NDC update. This participation was channeled through the COP25 Scientific Committee, coordinated by the Ministry of Science, where more than 600 Chilean scientists split across seven working groups contributed evidence that has allowed us to contextualize what it means to incorporate the carbon budget into the Chilean reality and, along with it , clearly establish a goal and a peak year in terms of Greenhouse Gas emissions. In addition, there were contributions from the scientific community on oceans, adaptation, biodiversity and the development of the Strategy for Development and Technology Transfer for Climate Change.”

 

Central theme

Chile’s updated NDC takes a novel approach, presenting a cross-cutting Social Pillar on Just Transition and Sustainable Development. This component serves as an anchor to structure the country’s commitments to tackle climate change in compliance with the Paris Agreement, while simultaneously taking forward the Sustainable Development Goals 2030 Agenda, established by the UN.

As such, the measures contained in the NDC consider variables such as water security, gender equity and equality, and the just transition, safeguarding the rights of the most vulnerable in the process of decarbonizing the energy system.

The other key components of the NDC are mitigation, adaptation, integrative action, and measures for implementation (technological capabilities and financing) – each with its own specific targets.

With respect to mitigation, Chile commits to a GHG emissions budget not exceeding 1,100 MtCO2eq between 2020 and 2030, with a GHG emissions maximum (peak) by 2025 and a GHG emissions level of 95 MtCO2eq in 2030. In addition, it targets a reduction of at least 25% of total black carbon emissions by 2030, relative to 2016 levels.

In terms of adaptation, various commitments have been made, among which the strengthening of data and mechanisms to manage the impacts of climate change on water security stand out. These include, for example, the establishment of an indicator nationally and at the scale of individual rivier basins by 2030, which will allow improved monitoring of hydrological stress and risks, helping the country drive towards improved water security.

Similarly, by 2030 strategic plans will have been drawn up for all of the country’s 101 hydrological basins, and all companies in the health sector will have established a plan for disaster risk management which considers those risks associated with climate change.

Meanwhile, in the component focused on integrative action, Chile has set out that a National Landscape Scale Restoration Plan will be established by 2021. This will contemplate the incorporation of 1,000,000 hectares of diverse landscapes into restoration processes by 2030, prioritizing those exhibiting greatest social, economic and environmental vulnerability.

With regards to implementation measures, the delivery of Chile’s Financial Strategy for Climate Change (EFCC) will begin this year.

It is noteworthy that the update of Chile’s NDC followed an extensive and wide-ranging process of stakeholder engagement, involving civil society, academia, the scientific community, and public and private sectors. This engagement began in order to inform the development of the initial NDC proposal and, once this was refined, the public consultation process began, generating 1,573 responses – many of which were included in the final project.

The COP25 Scientific Committee, through its seven working groups, also made crucial contributions to the development and improvement of the final NDC.